Forbes Coaches Council members come from a wide range of backgrounds. And with their wide range of experiences, they have a lot to share with clients and fellow members of the community. To help them share with an even greater audience, we’re profiling Forbes Coaches Council members here on the blog. This week: Yosh Beier.

Yosh Beier is a leadership coach and Managing Partner of Collaborative Coaching LLC, an organization aimed at helping leaders and teams establish collaborative, engaged, and aligned business environments. As an executive coach and global organizational development consultant, Yosh has consulted for the United Nations, NASA, UNICEF, and Fortune 1000 companies including Johnson & Johnson, Deutsche Bank, and NYSE/Euronext.

What inspired you to become a coach?

A theoretical physicist by training, I started consulting in the 1990s with a focus on technical and process issues. Over and over again, I saw that even “straight-forward” projects weren’t as simple as they should have been. The crucible was always human dynamics. That piqued my curiosity. What’s so hard about making collaboration happen? I immersed myself increasingly into systemic change management, leadership coaching and organizational effectiveness consulting. At the same time, I started doing my own personal work to create more meaning and accountability in my life. Inspired by the potential of personal growth, I trained as a therapist and mediator. Serendipity, too, played a role. Gradually, more and more team and leadership coaching requests came my way. I realized I had found my vocation, where I could bring my analytical and emotional intelligence to work by combining my extensive experience with both human and organizational dynamics.

What one piece of advice do you find yourself relying on most? Why?

An early mentor of mine kept emphasizing that we have to keep doing the work; there are no magic bullets. If we want to increase the quality and effectiveness of our personal and work relationships, if we want to cultivate leadership worthy of others to follow, if we want to inspire impact and growth, we must commit ourselves to constant reflection and learning, and work through interpersonal issues that could undermine trust or collaboration. Even something as seemingly rational and clear-cut as a strategic planning process is fraught with interpersonal dynamic and irrational decision making.

Self-aware, non-defensive, self-accountable collaborators have more energy and are better problem solvers. There is a level where the growth of teams and leaders barely depends on improving technical and managerial skills. I look at my professional growth as a form of personal growth and vice-versa. I encourage my clients to do the same.

What is the biggest hurdle your clients face? What advice would you give others struggling with this issue?

The pressure to deliver more at ever high quality with ever few resources has put a lot of my clients into a constant production mode. One consequence is they don’t make enough time for personal reflection, experimentation and rejuvenation. Another crucial consequence is that leaders and teams don’t make enough time to work through interpersonal issues. However, while time is saved in the short-term, in the long-term, relationships are frayed and poor alignment is perpetuated. Another issue relates to strategic execution: leaders pursue too many (or even conflicting) goals at the same time.

My advice is two-fold: rhythm and focus. We need regular monthly, quarterly, and annual events that allow us to reflect, challenge the status quo, and deepen relationships. A once-a-year offsite is just not enough. Focus relates to defining realistic priorities and boundaries, then making tangible accomplishments first before starting something else.

LOCATION

Forbes Councils
745 Atlantic Avenue
Boston, MA 02110

LOCATION

Forbes Councils
745 Atlantic Avenue
Boston, MA 02110

© CommunityCo, Inc. All rights reserved. | Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy | CommunityCo™, YEC®, and the other denoted terms Read More and the related trade dress are a non-exclusive list of the trademarks of CommunityCo, Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries. CommunityCo’s trademarks and trade dress may not be used in connection with any product or service that is not CommunityCo’s, in any manner that is likely to cause confusion among customers, or any manner that disparages CommunityCo, Inc. This site contains the trademarks, service marks, and logos of third parties and such trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective owners and not owned by CommunityCo, Inc. Such third party trademark owners may or may not be affiliated with, connected to, or sponsored by CommunityCo, Inc. These third party marks include but are not limited to Forbes®, which is a registered trademark of and the property of Forbes Media, LLC, and Forbes CommunityVoice™ which enables professional fee-based membership groups including Forbes Councils to create content on the Forbes digital publishing platform. Each topic-based CommunityVoice™ is produced and managed by Forbes Councils.